Mark S. Handcock

Professor and Chair of Statistics

Ph.D.: University of Chicago, Statistics, 1989

B.Sc. (Hons): University of Western Australia, Mathematics, 1983

Office: 8105C Mathematical Sciences Building

Phone: 310-817-6778                 Fax: 206-457-1953           Mailing Address
E-mail:
handcock@ucla.edu

             Curriculum Vitae (PDF)           Bibliography (with citation information)           PubMed Central bibliography (NIH Public Access)

             eScholarship bibliography (UC Public Access)

Research Interests

Dr. Handcock's research involves methodological development, and is based largely on motivation from questions in the social sciences.

His work focuses on the development of statistical models for the analysis of social network data, spatial processes and longitudinal data arising in labor economics.

Recent applications have been to social relations networks with the objective of understanding the social determinants of HIV spread, and the combination of survey and population-level information.

He also works in the fields of distributional comparisons, environmental statistics, spatial statistics and inference for stochastic processes.

Recent applications have been to models for stream networks that combine information from multiple environmental surveys, models of stochastic curves with application to job instability and age-earnings profiles, and the development of graphical tools for distributional comparison.

Interdisciplinary affiliations at UCLA

He is an affiliate of the California Center for Population Research. He is a Adjunct Faculty of RAND Corporation.


Teaching

Fall 2016, 2015, 2014:

o       STATS 102A Introduction to Computational Statistics with R

Fall 2017, Winter 2017, Spring 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011:

o       STATS 218 Statistical Analysis of Networks

Winter 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012:

o       STATS 202B Matrix Algebra and Optimization

o       STATS C216 Social Statistics

Fall 2014:

o       STATS 102A Introduction to Computational Statistics with R

Fall, Winter, Spring 2013, 2012, 2011:

o       STATS 290 Current Literature in Statistics

Dr. Handcock moved from the University of Washington in 2010. His older classes at the University of Washington were:

Spring 2009:

o       STAT 529 Sample Survey Techniques

Autumn 2007:

o       STAT 220 Basic Statistics

Autumn 2003-2006, Spring 2007-2008, Autumn 2008:

o       CSS&S 567 Statistical Analysis of Networks Jointly listed as STAT 567 and SOC 567.

Winter 2004-2007:

o        CSS&S 321 Case-based Social Statistics I Jointly listed as STAT 321 and SOC 321.

Spring 2004:

o        CSS&S 560 Hierarchical Modeling for the Social Sciences Jointly listed as STAT 560 and SOC 560.

Winter 2003:

o        CSS&S 594 Distributional Methods Jointly listed as STAT 594 and SOC 590C..

Spring 2002:

o        CSS&S 322 Case-based Social Statistics II Jointly listed as STAT 322 and SOC 322.

o        CSS&S 505 Review of Mathematics for Social Scientists .

Winter 2002:

o        CSS&S 321 Case-based Social Statistics I Jointly listed as STAT 321 and SOC 321.

o        CSS&S 506 Computer Environments for the Social Sciences


Books

“A Casebook for a First Course in Statistics and Data Analysis,” John Wiley and Sons, 1995 (with S. Chatterjee and J.S. Simonoff).

“Relative Distribution Methods in the Social Sciences,” Springer-Verlag, New York, 1999 (with M. Morris).

“Divergent Paths: Economic Mobility in the New American Labor Market,” Russell Sage Foundation, New York, June 2001 (with A. D. Bernhardt, M. Morris and M. Scott).

Peer-Reviewed Publications

          Bibliography (with citation information)           PubMed Central bibliography (NIH Public Access)              (There are further details of publications on my curriculum vitae (PDF))

Software

o       RDS Analyst is a software package for the analysis of Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) data that implements recent advances in statistical methods. RDS Analyst has an easy-to-use graphical user interface to the powerful and sophisticated capabilities of the computer package R. It provides a comprehensive framework for working with RDS data, including tools for sample and population estimations, testing, confidence intervals and sensitivity analysis.

o       For more information on Relative Distribution Methods, including the preface to the book, data sets, and software to implement the methods are available from the Relative Distribution website.

o       For more information on R software to implement the statistical methods described in the paper Resource utilization by an avian nest predator: relating resources to a probabilistic measure of animal space use, by John M. Marzluff, J. J. Millspaugh, P. Hurvitz, and Mark S. Handcock, Ecology, 2004, 85:1411-1427, see the Resource Utilization Function Estimation website.

o       The R software package statnet: software tools for the representation, visualization, analysis and simulation of social network data.

o       The R software package latentnet: software to fit and evaluate latent position and cluster models for statistical networks.

o       The R software package networksis: A Package to Simulate Bipartite Graphs with Fixed Marginals through Sequential Importance Sampling.

o       The R software package ergm: A Package to Fit, Simulate and Diagnose Exponential-Family Models for Networks.

o       The R software package glmc: Fitting Generalized Linear Models Subject to Constraints.

o       The R software package RDS: Provides functionality for carrying out estimation with data collected using Respondent-Driven Sampling.

o       The R software package sspse: Estimating Hidden Population Size using Respondent Driven Sampling Data.

o       The R software package network: Classes for Relational Data (Carter T. Butts, maintainer).

o       The R software package ergm.userterms: User-specified terms for the statnet suite of packages.

o       The R software package degreenet: Models for Skewed Count Distributions Relevant to Networks.

Representative Research Grants and Awards PI or co-PI only

o        The National Science Foundation
“BIGDATA: Collaborative Research: IA: Population Reproduction of Poverty at Birth from Surveys, Censuses, and Birth Registrations”
Jan 1, 2017 to Dec 31, 2019.

o        The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
“Innovations In Network Modeling For HIV Prevention Studies”
Sep 24, 2013 to May 31, 2016.

o        The National Science Foundation
“Scalable Model-Based Inference for Social Networks from Complex Sampling Designs”
Sep 15, 2014 to Jul 31, 2016.

o        UCLA: OVCR-COR TSG
“Lifting the Fog: Networks of Career Opportunity for Minorities”
(with Barbara Lawrence, PI) Dec 1, 2012 to Sep 1, 2015.

o        The Office of Navel Research
“MURI: Scalable Methods for the Analysis of Networks-Based Data”
(with Padhraic Smyth, et al), May 8, 2008 to May 7, 2015, $5,381,300 UW subcontract $600,000.

o        The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
“Valid Inference for Respondent Driven Sampling of Hidden Networked Populations”
Sept 1, 2010 to Aug 31, 2012.

o        The National Science Foundation
“Statistical Methods for Respondent Driven Sampling Data”
Sep 1, 2009 to Aug 31, 2012, $269,318.

o        National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
“Immigration, Emigration, and Age-by-Country Structure of Mexican Cohort Lifetimes”
(with M. Rendall), August 2007 -- July 2009, subcontract $64,000.

o        National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
“Combining Survey and Population Data on Births and Family”
(with M. Rendall), June 2003 -- May 2007, $1,095,133.

o        National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
“Modeling HIV and STDs in Drug User and Sexual Networks,”
(with M. Morris), July 2001 -- June 2006, $2,237,939.

o        The National Science Foundation and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
“Statistical Methods for Ecological Assessment of Riverine Systems by Combining Information from Multiple Sources,”
January 2001 - December 2003, $205,344.

o        National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
“Quantifying HIV Transmission Risk in Sex/Drug Networks,” (with M. Morris), March 2002 - February 2007, $750,000.

o        The National Science Foundation
“Modeling the Interactions between Real Estate Development, Land Cover Change, and Bird Diversity,” (with Marina Alberti, Paul Waddell, and John Marzluff), September 1, 2001 to February 28, 2005, $1,128,818.

o        The National Science Foundation
“Hybrid Population-average and Individual-specific Models for Clustered Longitudinal Data,” (with M. Scott), July 2000 - June 2002, $132,000.

o        The National Science Foundation
“Nonparametric Models for Incomplete Clustered Data with Applications to the Social Sciences,” (with M. J. Akritas, and W. Osgood),
July 2000 - June 2002, $88,024.


Some links to publications up to 2010

For the recent publications see: Bibliography (with citation information)     and      PubMed Central bibliography (NIH Public Access)

            

“Respondent-Driven Sampling: An Assessment of Current Methodology” (2010) (with Krista J. Gile). Sociological Methodology, 40, doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9531.2010.01223.x. Published online June 28, 2010. Manuscript at http://arxiv.org/abs/0904.1855

 

“A Description of Within-family Resource Exchange Networks in a Malawian Village,” (2010) (with Gail E. Potter). Demographic Research, 23, 6, pp. 117-152. doi:10.4054/DemRes.2010.23.6..

 

“Resolving Contested Elections: The Limited Power of Post-Vote Vote Choice Data,” (2010) (with Adam Glynn and Thomas S. Richardson). The Journal of the American Statistical Association, 105, 1, pp. 84-91. doi:10.1198/jasa.2009.ap08640.

 

“Representing Degree Distributions, Clustering, and Homophily in Social Networks With Latent Cluster Random Effects Models” (2009) (with Pavel Krivitsky, Peter Hoff and Adrian E. Raftery). Social Networks,, 31, 3, 204-213.

 

“Goodness of Fit of Social Network Models” (2008) (with David R. Hunter and Steven Goodreau). Journal of the American Statistical Association, 103, 1, pp. 248-258.

 

“Generalised Linear Models Incorporating Population Level Information: An Empirical Likelihood Based Approach” (2008) (with Sanjay Chaudhuri and Michael S. Rendall). Journal of the Royal  Statistical Society, B, 70, Part 2, pp. 311-328.

 

“Bayesian estimation of Hispanic fertility hazards from survey and population data” (2008) (with Michael S. Rendall and Stefan H. Jonsson). Demography, 46, 1, 65-83.

 

Modeling Networks from Sampled Data” (2010) (with Krista J. Gile). Annals of Applied Statistics, 4, 1, 5-25.

 

“Degree distributions in sexual networks: A framework for evaluating evidence” (2008) (with Deven Hamilton and Martina Morris). Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Jan 35, 1, 30-40.

 

“Comparison of Maximum Pseudo Likelihood and Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Exponential Random Graph Models” (2008) (with Marijtje van Duijn and Krista J. Gile). Social Networks, 30, 1, 52-62.

 

statnet: Software Tools for the Representation, Visualization, Analysis and Simulation of Network Data.” (2008) (with Steven M. Goodreau, David R. Hunter, Carter T. Butts, and Martina Morris). Journal of Statistical Software, 24(1). URL: http://www.jstatsoft.org/v24/i01

 

ergm: A Package to Fit, Simulate and Diagnose Exponential-Family Models for Networks.” (2008) (with Steven M. Goodreau, David R. Hunter, Carter T. Butts, and Martina Morris). Journal of Statistical Software, 24(3). URL: http://www.jstatsoft.org/v24/i03

 

“Specification of Exponential-Family Random Graph Models: Terms and Computational Aspects.” (2008) (with David R. Hunter and Martina Morris). Journal of Statistical Software, 24(4). URL: http://www.jstatsoft.org/v24/i04

 

“Fitting Latent Cluster Models for Social Networks with latentnet.” (2008) (with Pavel N. Krivitsky). Journal of Statistical Software, 24(5). URL: http://www.jstatsoft.org/v24/i05

 

networksis: A Package to Simulate Bipartite Graphs with Fixed Marginals through Sequential Importance Sampling.” (2008) (with Ryan Admiraal). Journal of Statistical Software, 24(8). URL: http://www.jstatsoft.org/v24/i08

 

“A statnet Tutorial.” (2008) (with Steven M. Goodreau, David R. Hunter, Carter T. Butts, and Martina Morris). Journal of Statistical Software, 24(9). URL: http://www.jstatsoft.org/v24/i09

 

“Population constraints on pooled surveys in demographic hazard modeling.” (2008) (with Michael Rendall, Ryan Admiraal, Alessandra DeRose, Paola DiGiulio, and Filomena Racioppi). Statistical Methods and Applications, DOI 10.1007/s10260-008-0106-8.

 

“Alleviating Linear Ecological Bias and Optimal Design with Subsample Data.” (2008) (with Adam Glynn, Jon Wakefield, and Thomas Richardson). Journal of the Royal  Statistical Society, A, 171, Part 1, pp. 179-202.

 

“Model-Based Clustering for Social Networks” (2007) (with Adrian E. Raftery and Jeremy Tantrum). Journal of the Royal  Statistical Society, A, 170, 2, 301-354 as a read paper.

 

“A curved exponential family model for complex networks” (2008). (with Martina Morris) Computational and Mathematical Organization Theory, DOI 10.1007/s10588-008-9055-x.

 

“Model-Based Combination of Spatial Information for Stream Networks” (2007). Environmental and Ecological Statistics, 14,3, DOI: 10.1007/s10651-007-0015-2.

 

“Recent developments in Exponential Random Graph (p*) Models for Social Networks.” (2006) (with Garry Robins, Tom Snijders, Peng Wang, and Philippa Pattison). Social Networks, 29,2,192-215.

 

“Positional Estimation within the Latent Space Model for Networks” (2006) (with S. Shortreed and P. Hoff), Methodology, 2006, 2, No. 1, 24-33.

“Prevalence of HIV Infection Among Young Adults In The U.S.: Results From The Add Health Study” (2005) (with Martina Morris, et al.). American Journal of Public Health, June 1 2006; 96: 1091-1097.

“Inference in curved exponential family models for networks” (2006) (with D. R. Hunter). Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics, 15, 3, September 2006, pp. 565-583.

“New specifications for exponential random graph models” (2006) (with Tom A.B. Snijders, Philippa E. Pattison and Garry L. Robins). Sociological Methodology, 36, 99-153.

“Improved Regression Estimation of a Multivariate Relationship with Population Data on the Bivariate Relationship” (2005) (with M. S. Rendall and J. E. Cheadle). Sociological Methodology, 35, 303-346.

 

“Interval estimates for epidemic thresholds in two-sex network models.” (2005) (with J. H. Jones).  Theoretical Population Biology, 70 (2): 125-134 Sep 2006.

 

“Persistent Inequality?  Answers from Hybrid Models for Longitudinal Data.” (2005) (with M. A. Scott), Sociological Methods and Research, 34, 1, 3-30.

“Comparative Geographic Concentrations of Four Sexually Transmitted Infections” (2004) (with R. P. Kerani H. H. Handsfield, and K. K. Holmes). American Journal of Public Health, Feb 1 2005; 95 (2): 324-330.

“Sexual contacts and epidemic thresholds” (2003). Nature, 423, 6940, 605-606 (with J. H. Jones).

“An assessment of preferential attachment as a mechanism for human sexual network formation” (2003) Proceedings of the Royal Society, B, 270, 1123-1128 (with J. H. Jones).

“Relating Resources to a Probabilistic Measure Of Space Use: Forest Fragments And Steller's Jays” (2004) Ecology, 85(5), 1411-1427 (with J. Marzluff, J. J. Millspaugh, and P. Hurvitz).

“Latent Space Approaches to Social Network Analysis” (2002) Journal of the American Statistical Association, 97, 1090-1098. (with P. Hoff and A. E. Raftery).

“Covariance Models for Latent Structure in Longitudinal Data,” Sociological Methodology, 2001, 31, 265-303. (with M. Scott).

“Comparing earnings inequality using two major surveys.” Monthly Labor Review, 123, 3 (March 2000), p. 48-61. (with M. Morris and A. D. Bernhardt).

“Combining Survey and Population Data on Births and Family.” Demography, 2000, Demography, 37, 2, p. 187-192. (with M. Rendall and S. Huovilainen).

“Trends in Job Instability and Wages for Young Adult Men,” Journal of Labor Economics, 1999 (with A.D. Bernhardt, M. Morris and M. Scott).

“Relative Distribution Methods” Sociological Methodology, 1998, 28, 53-97, (with M. Morris).

“Women's Gains or Men's Losses? A closer look at the Shrinking Gender Gap in Earnings,” American Journal Sociology, 1995 (with A.D. Bernhardt and M. Morris).

“An Approach to Statistical Spatial-Temporal Modeling of Meteorological Fields,” (with discussion); Journal of the American Statistical Association, 1994 (with J. Wallis).

“Economic Inequality: New Methods for New Trends,” American Sociological Review, 1994 (with A.D. Bernhardt and M. Morris).

“A Bayesian Analysis of Kriging,” Technometrics, 1993 (with M.L. Stein).

“On Cascading Latin Hypercube Designs and Additive Models for Experiments,” Communications in Statistics, 1991.

“Some Asymptotic Properties of Kriging When the Covariance Function is Misspecified,” Mathematical Geology, 1989 (with M.L. Stein).


Archived Working Papers

Some older working papers at the University of Washington are:

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 66(117M bytes) [PDF(353K bytes )]

“Model-based Assessment of the Impact of Missing Data on Inference for Networks”

 Krista J. Gile and Mark S. Handcock

 November 2006.

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 51(1.3M bytes) [PDF(353K bytes )]

“Alleviating Linear Ecological Bias and Optimal Design with Subsample Data”

Adam Glynn, Jon Wakefield, Mark S. Handcock , and Thomas Richardson

September 2005.

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 48(1.0M bytes) [PDF(119K bytes )]

Generalised Linear Models Incorporating Population Level Information: An Empirical Likelihood Based Approach

Sanjay Chaudhuri, Mark S. Handcock and Michael S. Rendall

May 2005.

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 47(2.0M bytes) [PDF(180K bytes )]

“Goodness of Fit of Social Network Models”

David R. Hunter, Mark S. Handcock and Steven M. Goodreau

April 2005.

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 46(1.5M bytes) [PDF(341K bytes )]

“Model-Based Clustering for Social Networks”

Mark S. Handcock , Adrian E. Raftery and Jeremy Tantrum

April 2005.

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 44(960K bytes) [PDF(181K bytes )]

“Interval Estimates for Epidemic Thresholds in Two-Sex Network Models”

Mark S. Handcock and James Holland Jones

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 43(6.1M bytes) [PDF(238K bytes )]

“Inference in curved exponential family models for networks”

David R. Hunter and Mark S. Handcock

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 42( 12M bytes) [PDF(544K bytes )]

“New specifications for exponential random graph models”

Tom A.B. Snijders, Philippa E. Pattison, Garry L. Robbins and Mark S. Handcock

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 41(1.9M bytes) [PDF(510K bytes )]

“Positional Estimation within the Latent Space Model for Networks”

Susan Shortreed and Mark S. Handcock

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 39( 17M bytes) [PDF(854K bytes )]

“Assessing Degeneracy in Statistical Models of Social Networks”

Mark S. Handcock

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 36(1.5M bytes) [PDF(360K bytes )]

“Improved regression estimation of a multivariate relationship with population data on the bivariate relationship”

Mark S. Handcock , Michael S. Rendall, and Jacob E. Cheadle

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 31 [PDF( 193k bytes )]

“On 'Sexual contacts and epidemic thresholds,' models and inference for Sexual partnership distributions”

Mark S. Handcock , James Holland Jones and Martina Morris

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 29 [PDF( 221k bytes )]

“Likelihood-Based Inference for Stochastic Models of Sexual Network Formation”

Mark S. Handcock and James Holland Jones

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 27 [PDF( 326k bytes )]

“Applying Relative Distribution Methods in R”

Mark S. Handcock and Eric M. Aldrich

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 23 [PDF( 148k bytes )]

“An Assessment of Preferential Attachment as a Mechanism for Human Sexual Network Formation”

James Holland Jones and Mark S. Handcock

 

CSSS Working Paper no. 21 [PDF( 108k bytes )]

“Statistical Evidence Tells Tails of Human Sexual Contacts”

James Holland Jones and Mark S. Handcock

 

 

Other current on-line technical reports.